Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich

THIS MONTH...

60 YEARS AGO

Elvis Presley starts his Sun Sessions in Sam Phillips' studio in Memphis, Tennessee.

 

50 YEARS AGO

July 1964 was swarmed with good music:
The High Numbers issued their one and only single, "A Hard Day's Night" appeared on disc and film, Manfred Mann put out "Do Wah Diddy Diddy", The Beach Boys latest album was "All Summer Long", The Honeycombs entered the charts with "Have I The Right", The Zombies launched "She's Not There" ... and Adamo released "Vous permettez, Monsieur?"

 

40 YEARS AGO

Heavy Metal Kids (Atlantic 50047) was released in July 1974, produced by Dave Dee at Olympic Sound Studios.

 

30 YEARS AGO

In July 1984, Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich were recording their New Greatest Hits album at Marcus Studios, Bayswater, London, England.

 

20 YEARS AGO

A Box set, "Thirty Years of Maximum R&B" was released in July 1994 by a famous British quartet: Meaty, Beaty, Big & Bouncy.

 

Shapes And Sounds Vol. Three CD

 

RECORD COVER BLUNDER

Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich were involved in one of the more spectacular record cover blunders in rock history.
In 1981, Polydor in Italy (Orbis) put out a huge series of albums called Historia De La Musica Rock ("The History of Rock Music") with one or two volumes for each of about a hundred different artists. The volume by the Dave Clark Five came out with the cover featuring a group photo of Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich! Speculation about how this kind of quality control gaffe could occur was that the photos were all in an alphabetically arranged set of folders, and when reaching in to the "Dave Clark Five" folder, a hand accidentally reached into the folder behind it, which was "Dave Dee." Or the photo could have been accidentally misfiled in the adjacent folder. But the really funny part of the situation was that nobody noticed the error until the album was in the stores! By then, they just figured, "Ignore it. No one will notice."

Adapted from: http://www.bsnpubs.com/mercury/fontana/fontana.html

 

JIMI HENDRIX AND TICH MEET IN BERLIN

Jimi and Tich meeting in Berlin
Competitors before a microphone - good friends in private:
Two hard competitors in show-business - peacefully united at the same table. I managed this rare shot shortly before the start of the television recordings with The Jimi Hendrix Experience and Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich in Berlin.
Not to withhold this rare meeting from posterity, I requested Jimi and Tich to sit together for the camera.
So they did - to prove that in private they were good friends.


This letter, written by Bravo reader Claus-Dieter Schmidt, was published in Bravo 1967/46, dated November 6th.
Like London-upon-Thames and Paris-upon-Seine, Berlin-upon-Spree was one of the 60's pop music European capitals. The TV show mentioned here was "4-3-2-1 Hot and Sweet", a ZDF (second channel) Saturday afternoon monthly show, hosted by Lotti Ohnesorge. The Jimi Hendrix-Dave Dee episode was broadcast on 2 September 1967. It was not a live show, so the recording took place sometime before, probably at the end of August 1967. Jimi Hendrix arrived in Berlin on 31 August.
On 1st September, Barry Gibb gave a party at the "Hotel Arosa" in Berlin for his 21st birthday. Jimi Hendrix and Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich were invited.

The two groups had already met in Frankfurt and Offenbach, for a common "Beat, Beat, Beat" Show on German TV in May 1967. But their first encounter was on 26 February 1967, in Southend, Essex, where Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich topped the bill - contrary to what is sometimes indicated elsewhere. At the time, Hendrix was only at the start of his new-found fame, and he was not yet the crowd-puller he was to become soon.

 

BBC SESSIONS ON CD

(The Zabadak Magazine review)

 

DAVE DEE, DOZY, BEAKY, MICK & TICH 'The BBC Sessions' BR Music BS 8026-2 (2CD)(77m56s)(69m18s)
(Netherlands) 1st March 2008

One great point of this 54 track release is that there are 9 (DD)DBM&T tracks here for virtually their very first true release, but there are also many other aspects, and so let's begin. Excellent to hear 'Hold Tight!' showing that they could reproduce their studio sound live & a fine solo from Tich. As we have previously said before then Dozy emerges as an underrated soul singer and his lead vocals on both 'Hands Off' & then (for first time release) 'Hello Josephine' being both top. The solid soulful 'Hello Josephine' is one of the best finds here (great track). Pity was never released on vinyl at the time (that session recorded 2nd August 1966) but again if so then we wouldn't have the pleasure to finally hear it now.

 

The 2nd of the new tracks is 'Watch Your Step' & though we've already heard before via BBC transcription discs and DVD great to hear it here in top quality. 3rd new one is '(You've Been A) Bad Girl' (written by Harman/Davies/Dymond/ Wilson/Amey) and is another good sound. This is one of the strongest written by the band in terms of catchiness. It is not psych but pure pop. 23rd track here (4th new) is 'Dr. Feelgood' which is a competent rocker. 'If I Were A Carpenter' is superb & suits the band. Tich with his special effects pedal creating a great guitar sound. On most of the well-known songs then it has to be said that the original studio sound is the superior, but that doesn't take anything away from these versions.

Many have been also especially re-recorded (it was BBC policy that this be done for their shows & probably related to a copyright decision) and so not really totally live as per example 'Zabadak' & 'Wreck Of The Antoinette' (done for the shows) & so there are just slight differences. The TOTP version of 'Zabadak' (which we've already heard on DVD) is a fine subtle re-interpretation (recorded on 5th October 1967) & may well be better than the actual single. There are in fact two different versions of 'Zabadak' here and both are fine. With 'Please' well then this version reaches new heights & interesting new touches – quite brilliant.

Slight disappointments are that 'Just Dropped In' is missing (as it did come out on a BBC transcription disc & was always particularly fond of this) and also 'Dancing In The Street', plus that there are no actual pics of the band from any of their BBC Sessions, reproduced in the CD booklet.

Moving on to CD-2 & 2nd track here then Dave Dee bravely tackles (not completely successfully) 'Paint It Black' (5th new) with star performers being Beaky & Mick with their interesting guitar & drums interplay. A cover of Buffalo Springfield & Neil Young's 'Mr Soul' (6th new) is an excellent outing with Beaky in fine vocal & Tich's extended solo. If some of these 6 (not released in the 60s tracks) had have come out on their 2nd & 3rd LPs then it could have strengthened DDDBMT's case back then rather than as is evident the paltry 15 weeks that they accumulated on the UK LP charts.

There's a fine re-interpretation of 'Loos Of England', which breathes new life into it (how many others had the courage to tackle songs like this one?). Strangely a couple are exactly the same as the original studio recordings. Was looking forward to hear how they'd perform 'Tonight Today' live but it was not to be (applies also to 'Bad News' & 'Mr. President' which both also sounded identical to the original studio recordings). 'Rain' though is quite different with now just the two lead guitars and is really live.

Getting to more highlights on this release, then there are the 3 new never before heard DBM&T tracks in 'Talk To Me' (Beaky's lead vocal), an excellent 'Helplessly Hoping' & 'Bluebird' (Dozy does the little lead on both of these otherwise its mostly shared vocals). 'Talk To Me' is in fact not the Small Faces song (that which was the flip of 'Here Come The Nice') as the track listing indicates, but is actually a cover of Moby Grape's 'Can't Be So Bad', which was an often covered fave with Brit bands.  Stephen Still's 'Bluebird' as per 'Mr. Soul' are both from the same Buffalo Springfield LP (one of the great albums from the 60s & which had a huge impact on the band). These 3 new additions revive strong memories of the 'Fresh Ear' LP and what could & should have been.

54th & final track on this 2CD release is the beautiful & peaceful 'Sweden'. Back to those 9 new ones, then each and all were certainly up to the standard at the time of those recordings that originally came out (on vinyl).

Congratulations goes out to BR Music & Bert van Breda (along with help from Herman van Gaal) for making this all possible & keeping the DDDBM&T flag flying high. 

 

Ron COOPER (ZABADAK Magazine)

 

 

 

 

TO THE MOUNTAINS OF THE MOON…

 

 

DAVE DEE R.I.P. 17 Dec 1941 - 9 Jan 2009

We are all in deep grief & need courage. A friend & a totally unique & gifted person has sadly now left this world. Since the age of fourteen & 1967 then Dave Dee has been a main hero…probably second to my father.
Loved his voice & DDDBM&T’s songs during the 60s which gave me then so much joy. So many great numbers & notwithstanding the obvious hits, there were great LP and B side tracks like ‘Love Is A Drum’, ‘Please’, ‘Shame’, ‘Mountains Of The Moon’, ‘Tide Is Turning’, ‘The Sun Goes Down’ etc.  
Then when Dave split from the others remembering now back then that I was quite devastated. Life continues on (you soon learn) and Dave picked himself up & (though some may disagree) released some really excellent solo singles which in my opinion deserved to have far greater success: He therefore remained a hero.

Then Dave’s story continued over the next 35 years with various reunions with DBM&T, sporadic album, single & odd track releases…each being eagerly anticipated. Highlights being the ‘Jean Musy/Few & Far Between’ and ‘Unfinished Business’ albums with even his Xmas songs having something special.
The last was in fact a really great version of ‘Stairway To Heaven’. Also my parents coming all the way from Australia got to see DDDBM&T back in 1985 in Luton. They were impressed.

Then there was his record company Double D venture in the early 80s which also loved and followed closely all those acts…the 12 singles & 4 LPs were treasures…bless the Dance Band, Sweat, Features, Marianne Chase, Fatal Charm, Zed etc. For me Dave deserved much greater recognition than what he ever received and that perhaps via the Zabadak magazine…that Dave would finally get some wider appreciation.
To be honest it never really quite happened, though in his last year quite a few things did began (to happen) - 'Hold Tight' played a key part in the film Death Proof; the release of the book 'Hold Tight! The Sarum Sound'; the release of the DDDBM&T BBC Recordings; 'Bend It'; appearing in a Kellogg's ITV TV advert; the Salisbury Blue Plaque Award for DDDBM&T - a fine achievement & recognition for the band; the Universal The Very Best Of release which saw the band back in the studio doing versions of six of their live favourites– the album reached no.24 in the UK charts (after unbelievably almost 42 years of absence in the album charts); and finally hearing 'Hold Tight' played now twice on the main French TV channel TF1.

I spoke to Dave many times over the years – beginning from 1976 & when he was semi-managing AC/DC. He was always very sharp, clever, an honest person & with a keen sense of humour and who got my respect. He also enjoyed his sport & seemed to follow soccer, rugby & even cricket and could talk about a wide range of topics.
In recent years a number of their B sides have been gathering much respect in psychedelic circles & this had not passed the observation of Dave such that in a recent interview (he said with a twinkle in his eye) “We should have really carried on more in that vein & become sort of like another Pink Floyd & released ‘On The Light Side Of The Moon’ (a clever play & quite a double meaning but how true  - also perhaps a slight regret on Dave’s part).

At the end it was not such a shock because Dave had sadly been suffering from ill health for now a number of years but being the trooper he was you could never tell this from what was happening on stage…and also his final recordings showed he still was in really fine voice. It was a big pity that he had to suffer at the end though.
I wish now that I’d kept a bit closer contact in those last final 5 months but my own personal work situation was quite difficult. The last exchange I had with Dave really being back in September that he was quite proud & pleased to finally make the UK album charts again.

First heard the devastating news from Alan Clayson and then rang Tich & Dozy who were both seemingly quite destroyed. Condolence/tribute emails were in the mean time flooding including (from amongst many)  Alan Blaikley, Peter Daltrey, Marianne Chase, Dianne Finnegan, Peter Mason, Mario Sienknecht, Herman van Gaal, Olaf Owre, Ken Howard etc.
My wife & myself shed quite a few tears. She along with my son saw the band now almost 6 years ago in Salisbury in a night to remember. Dave Dee has been so very important to our lives. Our sympathy goes out to Dave’s family plus Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich. Again life goes on & DBM&T will pick themselves up, the show will go on & the spirit of Dave Dee will continue via them. He will be sorely missed but his music & image will live on & believe that he will now become better appreciated/remembered in the future generations. God bless you Dave.

Ron Cooper (Zabadak Magazine)

 

 

 

 

 If no-one sang and the only sounds
were the wind and the waves of the sea
If no voice rang, with a song of joy
Then what would this whole life mean to me
With no way to express how it feels

Loving and living, seeking and giving
What would this world be if nobody would sang

 


The sixties. The first names that spring to mind are 'The Beatles', 'The Rolling Stones' and 'The Kinks' to name a few. Wrong of course.
Lots of excellent Beat groups started in those days, often making their apprenticeship in Germany (Star Club), before securing a record contract.
That was the story of Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich.

On this website are displayed [almost] all the releases the group made. Lyrics, music sheets, picture sleeves (from various countries), or scans of the vinyl itself.
In short: take a walk through the Sixties (and the Seventies, Eighties, etc.), with Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich.


On You Tube we found two cllips with an interview with Dave Dee:

Loos Of England

Last Night In Soho

Do you have corrections ? Don't hesitate and e-mail us
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